Wednesday, August 3, 2016

#ItalianFWT Raises a Glass to Italian Rosato-Check out a Preview!

Italian Food, Wine and Travel Weighs in on Rosé 

Our Italian Food, Wine and Travel blogging group (#ItalianFWT on Twitter) has been writing about all of the different regions in Italy and what they have to offer in terms of food, wine, travel, culture and more.  We have discovered many tasty bottles of vino, cooked up new, mouth-watering recipes to accompany our vino and uncovered lots of hidden gems and exciting places to travel in Italy.  This month, we are excited to take a closer look at the blush colored wine we know as Rosé, and Italians know as Rosato.


What is rosé and how is it made?

There are three methods used to make the pinkish, rosé wine: maceration or skin contact method (direct pressing of red wine grapes for a short period of time), saignée method (bleeding of the must), and blending method (blending white and red wines-very uncommon). The amount of time the grapes are in contact with the skins determines the color or the shade of the wine. As the color or shade of rosés and/or rosatos vary, so does the sweetness level. Additionally, a rosé can be still or sparkling.

Although Italian rosato is usually associated with Puglia, it is found all over the peninsula, in every region. Moreover, Italian rosés are made from many different grape varieties, as opposed to the same few that other rosé-producing countries use (syrah, grenache, pinot noir).  Some examples of the grape varieties used in Italian rosato production are Bonarda, Brachetto and Lambrusco in the northern regions, Nebbiolo, Canaiolo, Sangiovese and Montepulciano in the Central regions, and Negro Amaro, Aglianico, Bombino Nero, Frappato and Nero d'Avola in the southern regions.  There are over 1000 Italian wine grapes, so...you get the point!  

Therefore, this month, the Italian Food, Wine and Travel group are discussing Rosato from any region in Italy. It will interesting to see how Italian rosato compares to rosés from other countries, or even from one Italian region to the next. Since we also love to write and read about food and travel, we invite bloggers to share their stories on the regions of Tuscany or Puglia (since these are also rosé- producing regions).

So please join us, as our Italian Food Wine & Travel group weighs in on the rosés of Italy!

Join our Italian blogging group this Saturday, August 6 at 11am EST on Twitter at ‪#‎ItalianFWT‬‬‬ to chat about Rosé wines from Italy. Here's a Preview of What's to Come:
  • Camilla at Culinary Adventures with Camilla will share "Pizza con Patate + Cantina Zaccagnini Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo Rosé "
  • Orna at Traveling Italy will share "In the Pink: Rosato wines from Puglia"
  • Christy at Confessions of a Culinary Diva will share "Summer Sipping with Italian Rosés "
  • Jennifer at Vino Travels will share "Around Italy with a Glass of Rosé"
  • Jill at L'Occasion will share "Rosé or Rosato? Is There a Difference?"
  • Jeff at FoodWineClick will share "Rosato: A Rosé by Any Other Name Would Smell as Sweet"
  • David at Cooking Chat will share "Fresh Tomato Salsa Pasta with an Italian Rosato"
  • Martin at ENOFYLZ Wine Blog will share "#SundayFunday With Tormaresca Calafuria Rosé #ItalianFWT"
  • Li at The Wining Hour will share " There’s Rosé Under the Tuscan Sun too!"
About The Wining Hour

The Wining Hour writes about wine, Italy and global travel.  The Wining Hour boutique caters to wine-lovers across the globe by offering all wine-related items.  The Wining Hour markets unique wine décor and furnishings, accessories, glassware, barware, wine racks, storage and cooling options, games, gifts and more. The Wining Hour also hosts #wininghourchat on Twitter (@wininghourchat) on Tuesday's at 9 p.m. EST.(For more, see links at the top of this page)
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