Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Authentic Tuscan Gastronomy Guaranteed: Trattoria Da Burde #Food #Wine

If You Want Authentic Tuscan Food, Visit Trattoria Da Burde

I have been to the Tuscan region of Italy, Florence in particular, many times. However, it was only on my last visit that I had the pleasure of visiting Trattoria Da Burde.  The historic Trattoria Da Burde has been around since 1901 cooking the traditional Tuscan fare, which is based on family recipes and flavors that keep everyone coming back.

Da Burde is a place to enjoy a perfect Italian espresso or cappuccino, enjoy delicious antipasto, soups handmade pastas and steaks, buy fresh, cured meats and cheeses from their in-house specialty store, and sip on a nice glass of wine, as they have over 500 wines and champagnes.


From the moment I walked through the doors, all of my senses were awakened. I immediately felt like I was at my grandma's.  I felt warm and at home.  The Italian banter could be heard all around. Some of the family members, like zio (the uncle), engaged me in conversation, and I, again, felt right at home.  I could smell the olive oil, meats and cheeses, the rosemary, basil, sage, garlic and other Tuscan herbs and spices.  Something was simmering in the kitchen, and the smell was intoxicating.  My mouth began to water in anticipation.

I saw what any wine lover would love-the walls were lined with bottles of wine from the ceiling to floor! It was a most pleasant sight, especially as my eyes began to focus on the vintage years of the bottles.  My mouth watered even more! Now, regarding the things I tasted...forgetaboutit!  I had the privilege of tasting many of the Tuscan specialties, including pappa pomodoro (a tomato soup), farinata di miglio (a Tuscan dish made with chickpeas), panzanella (Tuscan salad made with bread, tomatoes and fresh herbs), melanzana ripiena (stuffed eggplant), peposo all'imprumetina (peppered wine stew), and zuccotto semifreddo (a typical Tuscan dessert cake).  The peposo all'imprumetina was divine with Brunello.  I only wish I had a bigger stomach, because the food was absolutely delicious!

I went to Trattoria Da Burde initially for business with the resident Sommelier, Andrea Gori. However, after business, it was pure gastronomic goodness!  I tasted one Florentine delight after another, and the food just kept coming.  My food was also paired with only the best regional Tuscan wines, (think Brunello) and the best prosecco (think Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore).

The wine list was rather extensive, chock-full of champagne, prosecco and all the regional wines dating back to 70's vintage years. It is quite probable that they had older vintages as well, considering that the walls were all lined with wine bottles from many vintage years. Moreover, each table had several bottles of wine on it, which served as adornment, contributed to the ambiance and provided fine choices to accompany the food.  It was fascinating!

Da Burde is located outside of the historic city center in Florence, so you won't just 'stumble' upon it. You have to plan to go there. Nevertheless, Da Burde will not disappoint.  It is well worth the trip. Burde is officially my Trattoria of choice in Florence for delicious, authentic Tuscan cooking. The fact that you will find one of the world's best Sommeliers there, is a huge value added and the icing on the cake!

The next time you find yourself in Florence, and looking for authentic Tuscan food, be sure to visit Trattoria Da Burde (Caffe Burde).

To read our interview with Andrea Gori (sommelier), please see Meet One of Italy's Top Sommeliers. Per leggere o guardare in Italiano, vedere Un Intervista con Andrea Gori: Sommelier Informatic d'Italia

About The Wining Hour

The Wining Hour writes about wine, Italy and global travel.  The Wining Hour boutique caters to wine-lovers across the globe by offering all wine-related items.  The Wining Hour markets unique wine décor and furnishings, accessories, glassware, barware, wine racks, storage and cooling options, games, gifts and more. The Wining Hour also hosts #wininghourchat on Twitter (@wininghourchat) on Tuesday's at 9 p.m. EST.(For more, see links at the top of this page)


For more information, please visit www.thewininghour.com.­­­

Follow The Wining Hour:


Source: The Wining Hour

Meet one of Italy's Top Sommeliers: Andrea Gori #wine



The Wining Hour Speaks with a World Renown Sommelier

Andrea Gori is a sommelier. However, he is not just any sommelier.  Andrea Gori is one of the most influential figures in the world of wine.  In fact, he is listed among the top twenty influential figures in the world regarding wine on the web, is in the top 3 in Italy and has the most widely watched channel in Italy.

There's more.  Andrea Gori is also a host, journalist, writer, curator, professor, organizer and founder of the God Save The Wine event, member of the Foundation of Italian Sommeliers, blogger (creator of Dissapore and Intavino) and much, much more, as this is far from an exhaustive list.  To learn more about this multi-faceted individual, I decided to interview him. Our interview, which was more of a friendly, intimate conversation, took place at his family restaurant, Trattoria Da Burde, where he is also, naturally, the sommelier. We spoke informally, and most of what we discussed, surrounded the following questions.  Here is a transcription of our conversation:     

TWH:  When did you become interested in wine? And how did this interest evolve?

AG:  It 'started "in the family". We are the fourth generation of restaurateurs in Florence.  All family businesses have their own problems, such as generational changes, and the older generations don’t always leave you space. So when I found myself thinking of working with Burde, I chose wine, because it was a role that would "free" from my father and my two uncles. Then, I started to learn more about wine and to enter regional competitions.  Next, I entered European and then World competitions. I tasted and sampled wines on Friday’s with my clients in the restaurant, and I filmed the tastings, wrote about them and put the videos online.  And this is how the blog, the podcast channels, twitter, videos on YouTube and everything else came about.

TWH:  Very good.  Ok, I see you have two passions-first a passion for computer technology and, then a passion for wine. You make it seem easy. How do you it (juggle)? Or is it difficult sometimes?

AG:  I always had a computer at home.  To start, I got the Commodore 64 in elementary school as a gift. And since then, I never stopped using the computer-gradually with Amiga, a PC and Mac. I always used the computer to study or work, and also for research at the university. When I became involved with wine, I used the computer immediately, as well as the emerging platforms like blogs, videos and podcasts.  Then, I used computers to communicate socially on the web.  These platform have proven to be ideal for communicating about wine and food, two items that people are always debating and discussing willingly. But, actually the aspect that I like more than communicating about wine is the wine itself, per se.

TWH:  Ah, yes, that says a lot.  That's why you are known as the Computer Sommelier! It's clear to see.

Now, in school, you studied biology and genetic engineering. Now, you speak about biodynamic wine. Tell me, what do you mean by biodynamic and how do your passions converge here?

AG:  It’s a big problem because I was among the first to speak about and to taste biodynamic wines in Italy and also to get excited about them. But for science, "biodynamic wine” is unacceptable and inexplicable, a little similar to some views of homeopathy. I am a scientist and Aristotelian; wine must transmit emotion and an experience, and this can be done regardless of whether it is conventional, organic or biodynamic. In my opinion, I think that the great wines are often biodynamic, because they are in a unique and extraordinary terroir where the sacrifice, and the chemistry, and the great attention in the vineyard make them even better. Biodynamics is fine, but it, in itself, does not make a wine better, unless the terroir in question is, indeed, extraordinary.

TWH:  Thank you. Interesting. Very innovative thinking.  Now..Champagne. You have been given the title of Ambassadeur deu Champagne of Italy. Please tell us about this aspect of your work.

AG:  Champagne, talking about communication, is truly unique and a world apart from wine, so much that anyone who does not drink wine often drinks champagne, and willingly ... It’s (Champagne) a great facilitator, that has always been used to promote celebrities, as in the time of the King of France or the European Royal Courts in 1700 and 1800 and today with Jay-Z! I like how it communicates, I like knowing how to sell it and I like to be a part of trying to understand the dynamics of communication and extraordinary marketing. It is also a big commitment because, aside from drinking it (It is not always easy to find or inexpensive to buy), it should also be studied with particular attention, more so than for other wines. But, in short, it can be a hard task that you do… if you are always under scrutiny and people expect you to know every detail of it since you are the “Ambassador of Champagne"!

TWH:  I can imagine!  So now, for the viewers, please tell us about GOD SAVE THE WINE (Dio Salva il Vino)

AG:  Ah. God Save the Wine, is a multimedia festival that combines print, web, photo, video and physical gatherings of enthusiasts.  It’s a festival focused on how to communicate about wine in an innovative, simple, direct way that goes against how the classic, typical, complicated and pompous academic methods are taught to many fans who enroll in the course for sommeliers. Compared to the courses and schools of traditional sommelier festivals and publishing products, with GSTW, we talk about wine with less reverence, more light, perhaps in a more Anglo-Saxon than Italian way. The idea is that "God Save(s) the Wine" from all those who want to make it too complicated. Wine is basically to be enjoyed and be comfortable with friends opening a bottles that they enjoy...

TWH:  Wow!  You are certainly innovative and very busy with the wine industry!

Now, finally on a lighter note, what type of wine(s) do you like? What’s your favorite?

AG:  Well…I like fresh wines that awaken and encourage intelligence in the mouth…Wines..then Champagne, but also the “new” Chianti Classico, the wine most consumed in the restaurant.  Of course, the Burgundian Pinot Noir and German Riesling...fascinating to understand and discover and are always as stimulating as the underlying terroir.

TWH:  Me too.  For me, though…I really love Prosecco.  Wine?  Oh, absolutely Amarone!

AG:  That’s a big one.  All of them...Barolo, Brunello, Barbaresco, Amarone…I like Amarone and Prosecco. Prosecco is a recent phenomenon but it deserves all its success.  I am always happy that this type of wine was invented, and it is increasing every year in quality and quantity. Congratulations to Prosecco!

Amarone is a wine that I like a lot.  It is very intriguing.  It’s very rich.  For me and for many fans, Amarone is considered challenging to drink with meals while remaining very good for "conversation". In any case, at Burde, Amarone never fails.  At least once a year we celebrate with it and a special, traditional dinner. It’s (Amarone) still a great wine, one with passion, strength, wealth, history, and the ability to embrace and pamper the palates of consumers.

TWH:  Yes, it is.  Well, that's it for now.  Thanks so much for everything and for this interview. Now…it’s time to eat and taste some wines with the innovative and muti-talented Andrea!

Despite his vast and in-depth  knowledge, Andrea Gori is a very humble and unassuming person.  It was both a pleasure and an honor to speak with him, get to know him better and hear his views on wine and the wine industry.  It was also a pleasure to taste some of the most delicious food and wine in the Tuscan region, both curated by Andrea himself at his restaurant, Trattoria Da Burde (Caffe Burde).  You can read more about that experience here (Authentic Tuscan Gastronomy Guaranteed).

To read and watch the original interview (in Italian), please see Un Intervista con Andrea Gori: Sommelier Informatic d'Italia

About The Wining Hour

The Wining Hour writes about wine, Italy and global travel.  The Wining Hour boutique caters to wine-lovers across the globe by offering all wine-related items.  The Wining Hour markets unique wine décor and furnishings, accessories, glassware, barware, wine racks, storage and cooling options, games, gifts and more. The Wining Hour also hosts #wininghourchat on Twitter (@wininghourchat) on Tuesday's at 9 p.m. EST.(For more, see links at the top of this page)


For more information, please visit www.thewininghour.com.­­­

Follow The Wining Hour:


Source: The Wining Hour

Gastronomia Toscana Autentica Garantita al Trattoria Da Burde Italiano #Cibo #Vino

Se Volete Autentico Cibo Toscano, Visitare Trattoria Da Burde

Sono stato nella regione Toscana di Italia, Firenze in particolare, molte volte. Tuttavia, fu solo durante la mia ultima visita che ho avuto il piacere di visitare la Trattoria Da Burde.  La storica Trattoria Da Burde è stato intorno dal 1901 cucinare i piatti tipici toscani, che si basa su ricette di famiglia e sapori che tenere tutti tornando indietro.

Da Burde è un posto per godere di un perfetto espresso italiano o un cappuccino, gustare deliziosi antipasti, pasta fatta a mano di zuppe e bistecche, acquistare freschi, salumi da loro negozio di specialità all'interno di e sorseggiare un buon bicchiere di vino-hanno oltre 500 vini e champagne.

Dal momento in cui che ho camminato attraverso le porte, tutti i miei sensi sono stati risvegliati. Ho sentito subito come se fossi a mia nonna.  Mi sentivo caldo e a casa.  Battute e conversazioni Italiane potrebbe essere sentita tutto intorno. Me alcuni dei membri della famiglia, come lo zio, impegnati in una conversazione, e io, ancora una volta, sentiti come a casa.  Ho potuto odore dell'olio di oliva, salumi e formaggi, il rosmarino, basilico, salvia, aglio e altre erbe toscane e spezie.  Qualcosa era bollire lentamente in cucina, e l'odore era inebriante.  La mia bocca ha cominciato a acqua in previsione.

Ho visto quello che ogni amante del vino sarebbe amore-le mura sono state allineate con le bottiglie di vino dal soffitto al pavimento. Era una vista più piacevole, soprattutto perché i miei occhi cominciarono a concentrarsi sulle annate delle bottiglie.  Mi è stato acquolina in bocca ancora di più! Ora, le cose che ho assaggiato... forgetaboutit!  Ho avuto il privilegio di gustare molte delle prelibatezze toscane, tra cui pappa pomodoro, farinata di miglio, panzanella, melanzana ripiena, peposo all'imprumetina e zuccotto semifreddo.  Il peposo all'imprumetina era divino con Brunello.  Vorrei solo che avevo una pancia più grande, perché il cibo era assolutamente delizioso!

Sono andato alla Trattoria Da Burde inizialmente per affari con il Sommelier residente, Andrea Gori. Tuttavia, dopo il lavoro, era pura bontà gastronomiche!  Ho assaggiato un fiorentino delizia dopo l'altra e il cibo appena continuava a.  Mio cibo è stato anche accoppiato con solo i migliori regionali vini toscani, (credo che il Brunello) e il miglior prosecco (si pensi Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore).

La lista dei vini era piuttosto estesa, pieno zeppo di champagne, prosecco e tutti i vini regionali risalente al 70's annate. È molto probabile che avevano vecchie annate pure, considerando che le pareti erano rivestite con bottiglie di vino da molti annate. Inoltre, ogni tavolo aveva diverse bottiglie di vino su di esso, che servita come ornamento, ha contribuito all'atmosfera e fornito scelte bene per accompagnare il cibo.  E ' stato affascinante!

Da Burde si trova di fuori del centro storico della città di Firenze, quindi è avete intenzione di andare lì. Tuttavia, da Burde non vi deluderà. È valsa la pena il viaggio. Burde è ufficialmente la mia trattoria di scelta a Firenze per la deliziosa cucina di Toscana autentica. Il fatto che troverete uno dei mondi migliori sommelier c'è un enorme valore aggiunto e la ciliegina sulla torta!


La prossima volta che vi trovate a Firenze e in cerca di autentica cucina Toscana, assicuratevi di visitare Trattoria Da Burde.

Per leggere o guardare l'intervista con Andrea Gori in Italiano, vedere Un Intervista con Andrea Gori: Sommelier Informatic d'Italia.  O per leggere l'intervista in Inglese, si prega di consultare Meet One of Italy's Top Sommeliers.

Riguardo The Wining Hour
The Wining Hour scrive di vino, l'Italia e globale dei viaggi. The Wining Hour si rivolge gli amanti del vino nel mondo offrendo vini tutti gli elementi correlati. The Wining Hour mercati regali unici di arredamento e mobili, accessori, articoli in vetro, bicchieri, portabottiglie, deposito e opzioni di raffreddamento, vini e altro ancora.  The Wining Hour ospita anche #wininghourchat (@wininghourchat) in Twitter il Martedi 9pm EST.

Per ulteriori informazioni, si prega di visitare www.thewininghour.com.­­­

Seguire The Wining Hour:


Source: The Wining Hour

Un Intervista Con Andrea Gori: Sommelier Informatico d'Italia #Italy

The Wining Hour Parla con Andrea Gori


Andrea Gori è un sommelier. Tuttavia, egli non è un qualsiasi sommelier.  Andrea Gori è una delle figure più influente nel mondo del vino.  In realtà, egli è elencato tra le migliori venti influenti figure per quanto riguarda il vino sul web, è delle 3 in Italia e ha il canale più visto del vino in Italia.

C'è più.  Andrea Gori è anche un oste, giornalista, scrittore, curatore, professore, Organizzatore e Fondatore dell'evento God Save The Wine, membro della Fondazione di Italiana Sommelier, blogger (creatore di Dissapore e Intavino) e molto, molto di più, come questo è lontano da un elenco esaustivo.  Per ulteriori informazioni su questo individuo sfaccettato (multiforme), ho deciso di intervistarlo. Nostra intervista, che era più di una conversazione amichevole, intima, ha avuto luogo presso il suo ristorante di famiglia, Trattoria Da Burde, dove è anche, naturalmente, il sommelier. Abbiamo parlato in modo informale, e la maggior parte di ciò che abbiamo discusso, circondato le seguenti domande.  Qui è una trascrizione della nostra conversazione:  

TWH:  Quando é iniziato il tuo interessarsi di vino? E come questo interesse si è evoluto?

AG:  E’ iniziato “in famiglia”. Sono la quarta generazione di osti in Firenze e come tutte le aziende famigliari hanno i loro problemi ai cambi generazionali, non sempre la generazione precedente ti lascia spazio. Per cui quando mi sono trovato a pensare di cominciare a lavorare da Burde ho scelto il vino perché era un ruolo “libero” da mio padre e i miei due zii. Ho cominciato poi per imparare sempre più sul vino e per affrontare i concorsi regionali, europei e mondiali. Assaggiavo e degustavo i vini al venerdì nel mio locale in mezzo ai miei clienti e riprendevo le mie degustazioni e ne scrivevo e mettevo on line i video. E’ iniziato così sia il blog che i canali podcast, twitter, i video su youtube e tutto il resto.

TWH: Va bene. Vedo che hai due passioni-prima una passione per la tecnologia informatica e, quindi, una passione per il vino. Sembra facile per te. Come riesci a farlo? O qualche Volta é difficile?

AG:  Sempre avuto un computer in casa a cominciare dal Commodore 64 che ho avuto in regalo alle elementari. E da allora mai abbandonato via via con Amiga, PC e MAc. Ogni volta usavo il computer per studiare o lavorare e anche per le ricerche all’università. Quando ho iniziato con il vino ho usato da subito il computer e le nascenti piattaforme blog, video, podcast e poi social sul web per comunicarlo, piattaforme che si sono rivelate ideali per comunicare vino e cibo, due elementi di cui le persone discutono sempre e volentieri. Ma in realtà l’aspetto che più mi prende è proprio il comunicare il vino più che il vino in sé e per sè.

TWH:  A, si, e molto.  Ecco perché sei chiamato sommelier informatico! E chiaro!

TWH:  A scuola, hai studiato biologia e ingegneria genetica. Ora si parla di vino biodinamico. Dimmi, cosa intendi per biodinamico e come le tue passioni convergono qui?

AG:  E’ un grande problema perché sono stato tra i primi a parlare e degustare vini biodinamici in italia e anche ad entusiasmarmi per loro. Ma per la scienza un vino “biodinamico” è inaccettabile e inspiegabile, un po’ come succede per l’omeopatia. Io sono scienziato e aristotelico, vino deve trasmetter emozione e farmi fare una esperienza e questo lo può fare indipendentemente dal fatto che sia convenzionale, bio o biodinamico. Secondo me i grandi vini sono spesso biodinamici perché sono in terroir unici e straordinari dove la rinuncia e la chimica e la grande attenzione in vigna li rendono ancora migliori. Biodinamica va bene ma di per sé non rende nessun vino migliore a meno che il terroir in questione non sia davvero straordinario.

TWH:  Grazie, interessante. Molto innovativo!  E poi, Champagne. Ti é stato dato  il titolo di Ambassadeur de Champagne per l'Italia. Ti prego, raccontacci di questo aspetto del tuo lavoro

AG:  Lo Champagne, parlando di comunicazione, è davvero unico e un mondo a parte rispetto al vino tanto che chi non beve vino spesso beve champagne e volentieri… E’ un grande laboratorio che ha sempre usato per promuoversi celebrità del suo tempo dal re di Francia o le corti regali europee nel 1700 e 1800 e oggi usa Jay -Z. Mi piace come si comunica e come sanno venderlo e mi piace farne parte cercando di capirne le dinamiche di comunicazione e di marketing straordinarie. E’ anche un bell’impegno perché oltre a berne (che non è sempre facilissimo trovarne o economico da comprarne) va anche studiato con una attenzione particolare, maggiore che per altri vini. Ma insomma, è una fatica che si fa volentieri anche se sei sempre sotto esame e la gente si aspetta che tu ne conosca ogni dettaglio visto che sei un "Ambasciatore dello Champagne!"

TWH:  Allora, Per gli spettatori, per favore dicci di GOD SAVE THE WINE (Dio salva il vino)

AG:  E’ un festival multimediale che unisce carta stampata , web, foto, video e ritrovi fisici di appassionati , un festival incentrato sul modo di comunicare il vino in maniera innovativa, semplice, diretta che va contro il modo classico accademico pomposo e complicato che viene insegnato a tanti appassionati che si iscrivono al corso per sommelier. Rispetto ai corsi e alle scuole tradizionali di sommelier nei festival e nei prodotti editoriali GSTW si parla di vino con minore reverenza, più leggerezza, forse in maniera più anglosassone che italiana. L’idea appunto è “dio salvi il vino” da chi lo vuole rendere troppo complicato. Il Vino è in fondo deve essere godere e stare bene con gli amici aprendo una bottiglia che gli piaccia…

TWH: Wow! Sei certamente innovativo e molto occupato con il vino!

Displaying
Finalmente-Infine, quale tipo di vino preferisci?

AG:  Allora, Io preferisco vini freschi che mi sveglino e che mi stimolino l’intelligenza e la bocca. Vini quindi come lo Champagne ma anche il Chianti Classico “nuovo”,il vino più consumato in trattoria, e ovviamente il Pinot Nero della Borgogna e il Riesling Tedeschi, affascinanti da capire e scoprire e sempre stimolanti per come sottolineano i terroir.

TWH:  Anchio.  Ma io preferisco molto prosecco, per vino-assolutamente Amarone!

AG:  A cuesto e la grande.  Tutti, Barolo, Brunello, Barbaresco, Amarone…A me piacciono Amarone E Prosecco.  Il prosecco è un fenomeno recente ma che merita tutto il suo successo, ne sono sempre felice, ha inventato un “genere” e sta aumentando ogni anno qualità e quantità, complimenti! Per me e per molti appassionati l’Amarone è considerato impegnativo da bere ai pasti pur rimanendo ottimo “da conversazione”. In Italia però i vini devono avere soprattutto una dimensione da tavola e anche in trattoria. In ogni caso da Burde l’Amarone non manca mai, almeno una volta all’anno lo celebriamo con una cena apposita. E’ comunque un vino grandissimo, passione, forza, ricchezza, storia, capacità di coccolare e abbracciare i palati dei consumatori.

TWH:  Grazie molto per tutto e per questa intervista. Ora vado a mangiare qualcosa e degustare il del vino con l'innovativo e splendido sommelier Andrea!

Guarda il video qui:  



Nonostante la sua vasta e profonda conoscenza, Andrea Gori è una persona molto umile e modesta. Era sia un piacere e un onore parlare con lui, arrivare a conoscerlo meglio e sentire i suoi pensieri sul vino e l'industria del vino. È stato anche un piacere di degustare alcuni dei più deliziosi piatti e vini della regione Toscana, entrambi a cura di Andrea stesso presso il suo ristorante, Trattoria Da Burde (Cafe Burde). Potete leggere di più su questa esperienza qui (Gastronomia Toscana Autentica).

Per leggere l'intervista in Inglese, si prega di consultare Meet One of Italy's Top Sommeliers: Andrea Gori

Riguardo The Wining Hour

The Wining Hour scrive di vino, l'Italia e globale dei viaggi. The Wining Hour si rivolge gli amanti del vino nel mondo offrendo vini tutti gli elementi correlati. The Wining Hour mercati regali unici di arredamento e mobili, accessori, articoli in vetro, bicchieri, portabottiglie, deposito e opzioni di raffreddamento, vini e altro ancora.  The Wining Hour ospita anche #wininghourchat (@wininghourchat) in Twitter il Martedi 9pm EST.

Per ulteriori informazioni, si prega di visitare www.thewininghour.com.­­­

Seguire The Wining Hour:


Source: The Wining Hour

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Southern France Rosés with Morrell & Co. #Winetasting

Rosé Wine Tasting with Morrell & Co. Fine Wine & Spirits- NYC


Image from Decanter.com

Rosé lover?  Ever traveled to the South of France?  Well, you do not have to travel that far because you can experience the south of France right here in New York. Morrell & Company and RobbReport/RobbVices (the source for all things in global luxury) hosted a Summer Rosé Soirée to present a taste of rosés from top producers in Southern France. 

Morrell & Company, located at Rockefeller Plaza, has been a neighborhood retail store since 1947.  It now comprises the Morrell & Co. Fine Wine & Spirits store, Morrell Wine Bar & Cafe, Morrell Fine Wine Auctions & Vintage Wine Warehouse. Morrell has both an extensive and impressive wine inventory that includes old and rare vintages.  Morrell Wine Bar & Cafe was voted "Best by-the-Glass Wine List in the World" by The World of Fine Wine and  "Best of Award of Excellence" from Wine Spectator.

Summer Rosé Soirée


Morrell assembled an amazing horizontal tasting of eight rosé wines.  The wines were from the 2014 vintage year, with the exception of one from 2013.  Morrell did not restrict the tasting to one region in Southern France, but facilitated a tasting that consisted of rosés from the Provence, Bandol, Cassis, Languedoc and Corsica wine regions.  

Provence
Provence is rightfully known as the heart of the Cote d’Azur for its beautiful countryside, food and language.  The tastings were from Domaine Ott Chateau de Selle, Chateau Minuty M de Minuty and Chateau Miraval Cotes de Provence Rosé 2014.  Although the Minuty is one of the most popular in southern France, of the trio, the Miraval agreed the most with my palate.


Bandol
Morrell shared La Bastide Blanche Bandol Rosé 2014 and Domaine de Terrebrune Bandol Rosé 2013. While La Bastide was young and light, the Terrebrune was darker, richer and showed well how allowing the rosés to age can have an immense impact on the taste.  Eric Asimov’s article in the New York Times about rosés from Provence, elaborated on the progression of rosé wines and the fact that, despite popular belief, rosé, too, needs to age.


Cassis
Cassis is a small fishing village in southern France known for signature fish dish, bouillabaisse, and its limestone walls, the Calanques.  It’s also produces great white wines and nice rosés, such as the rich, hearty one tasted: Clos Sainte Magdeleine Cassis Rosé 2014.  This same rosé was also highlighted by Asimov, who referred to this wine as “fresh, delicious and almost salty.”

Languedoc
Languedoc is France’s largest wine-growing regions.  It has a variety of climates along the Mediterranean and mountainous areas, which results in a variety of wines.  The main grapes are Carignan and Grenache. Languedoc produced the complex Puech Haut Prestige Languedoc Rosé 2014 tasted at Morrell Wine Bar.  There is much more to learn more about the Languedoc wine regions. View more articles and information here.  

Corsica
Corsica, which is an island to the southeast of France, is the birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte, who is said to have been very influential in Corisca wines.  Corsica's climate and viticulture is prime for making wine.  Although international grapes have been planted, most of their wines are made from the indigenous grapes, such as the aromatic Sciaccarellu.  These wines pair well with grilled fish and octopus.
Domaine Comte Abbatucci Faustine Vieilles Vignes Rosé 2014 was light and delicious.    

The wine tasting at Morrell was a delightful experience, as it provided more insight about rosés from the south of France.

If you are in the New York City area, want to buy or taste amazing wines and want a fantastic wining and dining experience, you must visit Morrell & Co. Fine Wine & Spirits and Morrell Wine Bar & Cafe.  


About The Wining Hour
The Wining Hour writes about wine, Italy and global travel.  The Wining Hour boutique caters to wine-lovers across the globe by offering all wine-related items.  The Wining Hour markets unique wine décor and furnishings, accessories, glassware, barware, wine racks, storage and cooling options, games, gifts and more. The Wining Hour also hosts #wininghourchat on Twitter (@wininghourchat) on Tuesday's at 9 p.m. EST.(For more, see links at the top of this page)

For more information, please visit www.thewininghour.com.­­­

Follow The Wining Hour:


Source: The Wining Hour

References:
Asimov, E. (2015, May 21). Rosé Wine from Provence Deserves to Live a Little. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://nyti.ms/1FqAyrT

Morrell & Co.